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Archive for August, 2011

ESRI User Conference

ESRI User Conference

The 2011 ESRI User Conference was held from July 11-15 in San Diego. Over 15,000 attended. You can view videos of plenary sessions and search abstracts and papers in the proceedings. Of particular interest is Jacqueline McGlade’s keynote on climate change titled “One Degree Matters“. Dr. McGlade is head of the European Environment Agency.

FOSS4G

FOSS4G

The 2011 FOSS4G (Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial) annual international gathering will be in Denver from September 12-16. This is the first North American event since 2007. The program includes several practical workshops, tutorials, and an introduction to geospatial open source. I imagine there will be lots of updated software releases in anticipation of this meeting.

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Scribble Maps You know how when presenting in a webinar, you can use the pen tool to scribble on top of your slides to help make your point. Scribble Maps works like that, only you draw on top of a map. The real strengths of Scribble Maps are in data creation and sharing. The ability to freehand draw makes the creation process much easier for simple maps. It is very easy to place new points, lines, shapes, text and images on the map and use the search tool to discover and add new features. The resulting maps can be exported and shared in several ways, including by email and Facebook, and as images, Google Earth KML files, and GPX files for GPS devices. Here is a quick Scribble Map to show the location of six panorama photos for the Great Lakes coasts of Wisconsin.

Here is a Scribble Maps tutorial that Wisconsin Sea Grant put together for a Great Lakes Observing System mapping workshop. Scribble Maps also has a Pro version — here is a more detailed review of Scribble Maps Pro by Eva Dodsworth at the University of Waterloo in Canada.

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State of the Coast

The State of the Coast

NOAA’s National Ocean Service¬†recently launched an excellent web tool – known as the State of the Coast¬†– allowing users to explore a variety of connections among coastal communities.

Susan Holmes, with the Special Projects Division at NOAA National Ocean Service, provided the following description of the State of the Coast tool:

“Within that narrow strip of land and water we call our coast, there is a nationally-significant story to tell. Our well-being as a nation depends on a suite of benefits that flow from healthy coasts: food, clean water, jobs, recreation, and protection from hurricanes. To help tell that story and encourage the need to better understand, manage, and protect our natural resources, NOAA has developed this State of the Coast (SOTC) Web site: a clear, simple, and engaging Web destination that will foster an increased awareness of the crucial importance of healthy coastal ecosystems to a robust U.S. economy, a safe population, and a sustainable quality of life for coastal residents.

The SOTC Website first offers quick facts and more detailed statistics through interactive indicator visualization maps that provide highlights of what we know about coastal communities, coastal ecosystems, and the coastal economy and about how climate change might impact the coast.  Secondly, the SOTC Web site offers case studies and management success stories that highlight often complex connections across the four State of the Coast themes: coastal communities; coastal ecosystems; coastal economy; and the climate.

Explore this site to gain a deeper appreciation of the connections among healthy coastal ecosystems, a robust U.S. economy, a safe population, and a sustainable quality of life for coastal residents…and the consequent need to better understand, manage, and protect our nation’s coastal resources.”

For any questions, please contact:

Susan Holmes
NOAA National Ocean Service, Special Projects Division
susan.holmes@noaa.gov
301-713-3000 x158

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